DSU signs Definitive Agreement to acquire Wesley College

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DSU signs Definitive Agreement to acquire Wesley College

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DELAWARE- In a historic move for HBCU’s across the country, Delaware State University, an HBCU founded in 1891,  announced Thursday it has signed a Definitive Agreement to acquire Wesley College.

“We are focusing on being bigger, broader, and substantively the most diverse contemporary and unapologetic historically black college and university in the country,” Tony Allen, DSU’s President, said.  We are told this will be the first time an HBCU has ever bought another non-HBCU institution. The two schools are planning to merge no later than June 30 2021.

“We share one vision in terms of education, should be provided for everyone without any discrimination about background about race,” Bob Clark, Wesley College’s President, said.  And the collaboration of the two schools is something both presidents said will impact not only the students, but the state of Delaware as a whole.  “Increases our economic impact, most importantly continues to serve the many students we represent that need our services perhaps now more than ever,” Allen said. 

While there is a lot of planning that needs to happen before the acquisition is finalized, like where funding will come from, DSU’s president is certain that they will adopt Wesley’s programs and talent.

“I think I can speak for all of my colleagues here that we want to put the best talent in the right position to drive the university forward,” Allen said.  “No matter how this ends up looking, no matter what responsibilities this campus takes on versus the main campus, the collective opportunity that we provide will only be amplified,” Clark said.  While both institutions said their schools will operate independently for now, they do feel it’s important to work together to navigate the challenges that the COVID-19 pandemic has brought, especially over the course of the Fall 2020 semester.  In the mean time, the schools are both working to figure out what’s going to happen with each of their individual sports teams.

Overall, they’re just trying to figure out how to make this transition as smooth as possible for their students and staff.

 

 

Courtesy: WMDT-TV